7 Ways To Balance Social Media With Real Life

Being totally present in a world full of Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, and texting can be hard. However, shutting it out completely doesn’t seem like a particularly realistic option for most of us. It’s why finding ways to balance your social media and offline lifeare actually super important for a meaningful existence.

According to an article in Quartz, Americans now spend an average of eight hours a day consuming media, and daily Internet use has doubled in the past five years (with the increase in smartphones mainly behind the growth). Basically, we spend over half our days plugged in, and a mere five years ago we were spending twice as much time present in the physical world around us — whether it was going for walks, talking to others, or just looking out a window.

And I know that many make the case that technology is our friend and makes everything more convenient and makes people and ideas even more connected than before. And while that’s definitely true on certain levels, deep down I think most of us wish we were more present in our lives and just doing more on a daily basis.

If any of this is ringing true for you (and more power to you if it’s not!) here are seven tips I’ve compiled for balancing social media with real life that will help you get the most out of both worlds.

1. Buy A Real Alarm Clock

In a compilation piece on practical ways to break free from you social media addiction on Real Simple, getting a real alarm clock — as opposed to using the alarm on your phone — ranked in the top three. Think about it — how often do you turn off your phone alarm, only to find yourself compulsively checking your e-mail or Facebook before getting up and starting your day? If you remove the phone from the equation, you might just find yourself with a few extra minutes of tranquility.

2. Make A “No Bedroom Allowed” Rule

This one leap frogs off the first tip and even takes it a step further. According to an op-ed in the New York Times by award-winning tech columnist Nick Bilton, we should all banish our cell phones from the bedroom entirely. Text goodnight to your friends, and then spend the last 30 minutes before bed reading a book or writing in a journal. If you do this Sunday through Thursday, you’ve already given yourself two and a half hours of extra mental space a week.

3. Dedicate Time For Face-To-Face Contact

In a piece for the technology and design site Hongkiat, lifestyle writer Michael Poh stressed the importance of making time for face-to-face interactions with friends. He noted that ideally, social media compliments the relationships we have in life as opposed to replacing them, and it’s important to carve time out for real conversations and interactions because of it. Make a standing date with your closet bud every two weeks, or make a point to see a good friend every Sunday. It will make such a difference.

4. Call — Don’t Text — A Friend

And in the face-to-face vain, it’s also worth picking up the phone and actually calling friends and family. In an interview with Everyday Health, Louise Hawkley, Ph.D., a research associate in the psychology department at the University of Chicago, said that research shows people seem to feel best when their relationships happen face-to-face or over the phone as opposed to just through social media. So the next time you’re feeling the urge to connect, trying making a call to a friend instead of posting a thought online.

5. Section Off Specific Time For Surfing The Web

In an article for Inc, tech author Damon Brown said he reserves an hour every morning for gluttoning himself on social media. “It’s like reading the morning paper,” he said. “I’m sitting there with my coffee and my bagel or whatever. Then it doesn’t matter if I don’t go on every five seconds. Since I started doing this, it’s really changed how productive I am, both for that hour, and for the rest of the day.” Try reserving a concentrated hour — no more, and no less — to social media every day and see how it feels.

6. Use Blocking Software

In that NYT’s piece, Bilton noted that there are actually apps you can use, like Self Control or Cold Turkey, that will actively block your computer from specific websites, meaning you won’t have to rely solely on your own willpower to stay off social media. This is an especially awesome tip for the workplace or for when you really need to be efficient with your time.

7. Take A Day Off

Brown said that he implemented little technology vacations every now and then, in which he keeps his phone and laptop off all day. “Personally, I know my level of focus increases dramatically,” he said. “It’s helpful during work, but it’s also helpful for paying more attention to my wife or even going for a walk,” and noted that just having technology inaccessible makes us all the more present in the moment.

Technology should ideally enhance our lives, not take anything away from us, and yet it can be incredibly hard to strike a healthy balance between our online and offline lives. The good news it, it’s not all that hard a problem to fix — you just need to be a little proactive and have a desire to change.

How Using Social Media Affects Teenagers

Many parents worry about how exposure to technology might affect toddlers developmentally. We know our preschoolers are picking up new social and cognitive skills at a stunning pace, and we don’t want hours spent glued to an iPad to impede that. But adolescence is an equally important period of rapid development, and too few of us are paying attention to how our teenagers’ use of technology—much more intense and intimate than a 3-year-old playing with dad’s iPhone—is affecting them. In fact, experts worry that the social media and text messages that have become so integral to teenage life are promoting anxiety and lowering self-esteem.

Indirect communication

Teens are masters at keeping themselves occupied in the hours after school until way past bedtime. When they’re not doing their homework (and when they are) they’re online and on their phones, texting, sharing, trolling, scrolling, you name it. Of course before everyone had an Instagram account teens kept themselves busy, too, but they were more likely to do their chatting on the phone, or in person when hanging out at the mall. It may have looked like a lot of aimless hanging around, but what they were doing was experimenting, trying out skills, and succeeding and failing in tons of tiny real-time interactions that kids today are missing out on. For one thing, modern teens are learning to do most of their communication while looking at a screen, not another person.

 

“As a species we are very highly attuned to reading social cues,” says Dr. Catherine Steiner-Adair, a clinical psychologist and author of The Big Disconnect. “There’s no question kids are missing out on very critical social skills. In a way, texting and online communicating—it’s not like it creates a nonverbal learning disability, but it puts everybody in a nonverbal disabled context, where body language, facial expression, and even the smallest kinds of vocal reactions are rendered invisible.”

Lowering the risks

Certainly speaking indirectly creates a barrier to clear communication, but that’s not all. Learning how to make friends is a major part of growing up, and friendship requires a certain amount of risk-taking. This is true for making a new friend, but it’s also true for maintaining friendships. When there are problems that need to be faced—big ones or small ones—it takes courage to be honest about your feelings and then hear what the other person has to say. Learning to effectively cross these bridges is part of what makes friendship fun and exciting, and also scary. “Part of healthy self-esteem is knowing how to say what you think and feel even when you’re in disagreement with other people or it feels emotionally risky,” notes Dr. Steiner-Adair.

But when friendship is conducted online and through texts, kids are doing this in a context stripped of many of the most personal—and sometimes intimidating—aspects of communication. It’s easier to keep your guard up when you’re texting, so less is at stake. You aren’t hearing or seeing the effect that your words are having on the other person. Because the conversation isn’t happening in real time, each party can take more time to consider a response. No wonder kids say calling someone on the phone is “too intense”—it requires more direct communication, and if you aren’t used to that it may well feel scary.

If kids aren’t getting enough practice relating to people and getting their needs met in person and in real time, many of them will grow up to be adults who are anxious about our species’ primary means of communication—talking. And of course social negotiations only get riskier as people get older and begin navigating romantic relationships and employment.

Cyberbullying and the imposter syndrome

The other big danger that comes from kids communicating more indirectly is that it has gotten easier to be cruel. “Kids text all sorts of things that you would never in a million years contemplate saying to anyone’s face,” says Dr. Donna Wick, a clinical and developmental psychologist who runs Mind to Mind Parent. She notes that this seems to be especially true of girls, who typically don’t like to disagree with each other in “real life.”

 

A TEENAGER’S VIEW ON SOCIAL MEDIA

I read technology articles quite often and see plenty of authors attempt to dissect or describe the teenage audience, especially in regards to social media. However, I have yet to see a teenager contribute their voice to this discussion. This is where I would like to provide my own humble opinion.

Facebook

In short, many have nailed this on the head. It’s dead to us. Facebook is something we all got in middle school because it was cool but now is seen as an awkward family dinner party we can’t really leave. It’s weird and can even be annoying to have Facebook at times. That being said, if you don’t have Facebook, that’s even more weird and annoying. Weird because of the social pressure behind the question, “Everyone has Facebook, why don’t you?” and annoying because you’ll have to answer that to just about everyone in classes you meet who makes an attempt to friend you or find you on there.

Facebook is often used by us mainly for its group functionality. I know plenty of classmates who only go on Facebook to check the groups they are part of and then quickly log off. In this part Facebook shines—groups do not have the same complicated algorithms behind them that the Newsfeed does. It is very easy to just see the new information posted on the group without having to sift through tons of posts and advertising you don’t really care about.

Messaging on Facebook is also extremely popular among our age group, mainly because they provide the means to talk to those people who you weren’t really comfortable with asking for their number but comfortable enough to send them a friend request.

Facebook is often the jumping-off point for many people to try to find you online, simply because everyone around us has it. If I met you one time at some party, I’m not going to try to check Twitter or Instagram to find out who you are. Instead, many opt for the ease of Facebook and the powerful search functionality that gives you results of people who you actually have a chance of knowing (unlike Instagram, whose search functionality, although it improved slightly in the last update, leaves much to be desired).

Instagram

Instagram is by far the most used social media outlet for my age group. Please note the verbiage there—it is the most used social media outlet. Meaning, although the most people are on Facebook, we actually post stuff on Instagram. It’s always fascinating to me to see a friend with 1500 friends on Facebook only get 25 likes on a photo yet on Instagram (where she has 800 followers) she gets 253. I have a few ideas as to why this could happen:

  • I’m not terrified whenever I like something on Instagram that it will show up in someone’s Newsfeed and they’ll either screenshot that I liked it or reference it later. The same goes for commenting.
  • I am not as pressured to follow someone back on Instagram, meaning my feed is normally comprised of content I actually want to see. That being said, I will come back and scroll through an application that has content I enjoy rather than one where I have to find the occasional diamond in the rough.
  • The content on Instagram is usually of higher quality. People take time to edit their photos with filters, use different brightness/contrast settings (it’s even one of the steps to posting a photo), etc., to make the pictures look the best they possibly can. This means the content on Instagram is normally “better” (photo-wise), so I am more likely to go back to the application.
  • Instagram hasn’t been flooded with the older generation yet (not everyone has an Instagram) meaning it’s “hip” and “cool” to the younger crowd. However, it is popular enough that if you have a smartphone it’s almost unheard of for you not to have Instagram, if not to take pictures, but to at least tag people in photos.
  • Another point: tagging. I don’t have to constantly check Instagram to make sure I wasn’t tagged in any awkward or bad photos. That’s because you can’t easily see them in your feed, making the whole experience seem way more private. Am I looking weird in a photo you posted? Who cares—I can just delete the tag if I really am that upset about it without fear that my friends from another social circle (who don’t follow you) will get to it first. I know Facebook has the ability to let you check every single photo tagged of you before it appears on your profile, but many people I know do not have that enabled or know it even exists.
  • People do not post 10000 times a day on Instagram. Many are much more polite about posting, either doing once a day, a few times a week, etc. This means that there isn’t a constant flow of content being shoved down my throat every time I open the application, and it is possible to be “caught up” with my Instagram feed.
  • There are no links on Instagram, meaning I’m not being constantly spammed by the same advertisement, horrible gossip news article, or Buzzfeed listicle about the “28 Ingenious Things For Your Dog You Had No Idea You Needed”

Those are some reasons why many people my age tend to use Instagram more than they do Facebook. Everything about the application makes it less commercialized and more focused on the content, meaning more teens are inclined to visit it. When we do visit the application it is a much more pleasant experience so we are more inclined to Like and interact with the posts more. This increases our interaction with the application, meaning we will use it more, etc.

Facebook gets all of the photos we took — the good, the bad, etc—while Instagram just gets the one that really summed up the event we went to. It is much more selective, and honestly people spend more time on the captions to make them relevant/funny. On Facebook we just throw up everything we got so people can tag each other and show our family members that we’re still alive.

Many of those younger than me (10–16 years old) who I’ve talked to about this matter don’t even have a Facebook — Instagram is all that they need.

Twitter

To be honest, a lot of us simply do not understand the point of Twitter. There is always a core group at every school that uses it very religiously to tweet and another group that uses it to simply watch or retweet, but besides that many don’t use it. It also isn’t extremely easy to find friends on the site and many just use it to complain about school in a setting where their parents/family members (not necessarily employers) are likely not to see it.

Twitter is a place to follow/be followed by a bunch of random strangers, yet still have your identity be attached to it (this distinction will be important later on). Your tweets are also easily searchable on Twitter which is good but not good if you want to be yourself and not have it follow you around when you’re trying to land a job. Thus, to others Twitter is used like Facebook—you post with the assumption that your employer will see it one day.

There are then three main groups of Twitter users: the ones who use it to complain/express themselves, the ones who tweet with the assumption that their prospective employer will eventually see whatever they are saying, and the ones who simply look at other Tweets and do the occasional RT.

Snapchat

Snapchat is quickly becoming the most used social media network, especially with the advent of My Story. If I could break down a party for you in social media terms, here’s how it would pan out:

  • You post yourself getting ready for the party, going to the party, having fun at the party, leaving at the end of the party, and waking up the morning after the party on Snapchat.
  • On Facebook you post the cute, posed pictures you took with your friends at the party with a few candids (definitely no alcohol in these photos).
  • On Instagram you pick the cutest one of the bunch to post to your network.

Snapchat is where we can really be ourselves while being attached to our social identity. Without the constant social pressure of a follower count or Facebook friends, I am not constantly having these random people shoved in front of me. Instead, Snapchat is a somewhat intimate network of friends who I don’t care if they see me at a party having fun.

On no other social network (besides Twitter possibly) is it acceptable post an “I’m soooo bored” photo besides Snapchat. There aren’t likes you have to worry about or comments—it’s all taken away. Snapchat has a lot less social pressure attached to it compared to every other popular social media network out there. This is what makes it so addicting and liberating. If I don’t get any likes on my Instagram photo or Facebook post within 15 minutes you can sure bet I’ll delete it. Snapchat isn’t like that at all and really focuses on creating the Story of a day in your life, not some filtered/altered/handpicked highlight. It’s the real you.

Another quick aside about Snapchat—I only know a handful of people (myself included) that believe Snapchat does delete your photos. Everyone else I know believes that Snapchat has some secret database somewhere with all of your photos on it. While I will save that debate for another day, it is safe to say that when photos are “leaked” or when there’s controversy about security on the app, we honestly do not really care. We aren’t sending pictures of our Social Security Cards here, we’re sending selfies and photos with us having 5 chins.

Tumblr

Remember in the section on Twitter I said, “Twitter is also a place to follow/be followed by a bunch of random strangers, yet still have your identity be attached to it”? Tumblr is a place to follow/be followed by a bunch of random strangers, yet not have your identity be attached to it. Tumblr is like a secret society that everyone is in, but no one talks about. Tumblr is where you are your true self and surround yourself (through who you follow) with people who have similar interests. It’s often seen as a “judgment-free zone” where, due to the lack of identity on the site, you can really be who you want to be. The only Tumblr URLs I know of people in real life are my close friends and vice versa.

Plus, it’s simple in Tumblr to just change your URL if anyone finds you. Your name isn’t attached to that profile at all so without that URL it is pretty difficult to find you again, especially for the typical parent snooping around. This really helps make the site a place where people can post and support others posts. There is a lot of interaction on this website in the form of reblogs because people just simply have feeds of only things they care about (and are then more likely to support with a like/reblog). I wouldn’t say a lot of “socializing” — at least in the way we’ve defined it in our social media society—occurs on the site, but people can really easily meet others worldwide who hold similar interests. This makes it a very alluring site to join for many teenagers, even just to make new friends.

Yik Yak

Yik Yak is a rather new contender, however, a ton of friends in college have the application. It has gotten to be so addicting because it focuses solely on the content of your posts—there are no followers, no profiles, nothing. Whatever is funny/relevant is at the top and everything else is at the bottom, whether Kanye West is the one who is writing it or some random kid who never talks in class.

There’s an advertisement I see often on Twitter for Yik Yak that says something along the lines of “Everyone’s on it before class starts.” I can 100% reaffirm that this is true. And everyone’s on it during class, talking about the class they are in. And everyone’s on it after class to find out what else is going on around campus.

While it hasn’t reached the popularity of the other networks, Yik Yak is a powerful contender that people actually use. Often I see people post about the fight for anonymity with other applications such as Secret. I can tell you that I do not know a single person in my network who uses that application. People reference Yaks all the time with each other or send screenshots, I have yet to ever hear of a hot post on Secret that everyone’s talking about.

A negative to Yik Yak, however, is how unused the application is whenever there is a school holiday. Yik Yak is only as good as the 10 mile radius around you, so if you are in an area with a low population of Yik Yak users, you won’t really be using the application much. The same can’t be said for the other social media sites on this list.

Medium

Many of my peers look for platforms to begin a writing blog that they can share with their friends and family. When I hear my friends say this, they automatically think of creating a WordPress site. For some reason, WordPress seems like the more “sophisticated” website to begin a blog. Others who have had experience with Tumblr will choose to open up a separate blog on there, one that is not connected to their “personal” blog on the platform.

However, once I have introduced Medium to those my age, I have never seen them turn back in terms of a platform to publish a blog.

What Medium does right is the “recommend” function. This is unseen on WordPress (besides the typical website sharing buttons) and is really what makes Medium a community, not just a bunch of individual sites. Having a simple “Follow” system also makes it so that you come back to Medium even if you aren’t looking to write a blog. Medium also has an emphasis on commenting right next to the text (as opposed to a lengthy comment section at the bottom).

Medium’s only challenge is becoming known to the teenage audience. The layout of the site as well as the content is all there, what is needed is just the recognition of our age group. I feel that over time as more teenagers begin to discover Medium, many of my peers will begin blogging here.

The Others

Here are other social media networks that some teens use but that don’t really require a full-length discussion:

  • LinkedIn — We have to get it, so we got it. Many wait until college to get this (as they probably should, it isn’t for this demographic anyways).
  • Pinterest—It’s mainly female-dominated and is for those who have an artsy/hipster focus. Not too many people talk about it.
  • Kik—It’s a messaging application that is mainly used for messaging people on Twitter I guess? I don’t know anyone who uses it. The only time I ever hear this application is for the joke, “Aye you got Kik?”, normally seen as someone trying to “spit game” to attract a partner. It’s really difficult for me to describe it here but it isn’t super relevant.
  • WhatsApp—You download it when you go abroad, you use it there for a bit before going back to iMessage and Facebook Messenger, then you delete it. I know tons of people who use it to communicate with friends they made abroad, but I feel like Messenger is beginning to overshadow it. For international students, however, WhatsApp is a pivotal tool that I’ve heard is truly useful.
  • GroupMe—By far the most used group messaging application in college. Everyone has one, uses it and loves it. GIF support, the ability to “like” others messages, even trivial things such as being able to change your name between group chats all make this both a useful and enjoyable application. GroupMe also works for literally any phone or device…it is on desktop, iPhone, Android, and can work over text as well for those who may not have a smartphone.

Social Media Usage By Teens: The Dangers of Drawing Wrong Conclusions

 

  • Facebook: “It’s dead to us. Facebook is something we all got in middle school because it was cool but now is seen as an awkward family dinner party we can’t really leave. It’s weird and can even be annoying to have Facebook at times. That being said, if you don’t have Facebook, that’s even more weird and annoying.”
  • Instagram: “By far the most used social media outlet for my age group. Although the most people are on Facebook, we actually post stuff on Instagram. It’s always fascinating to me to see a friend with 1500 friends on Facebook only get 25 likes on a photo yet on Instagram (where she has 800 followers) she gets 253.”
  • Twitter: “There are three main (teenage) groups of Twitter users: the ones who use it to complain/express themselves, the ones who tweet with the assumption that their prospective employer will eventually see whatever they are saying, and the ones who simply look at other Tweets and do the occasional RT.”
  • Snapchat: “Snapchat is quickly becoming the most used social media network, especially with the advent of My Story. Snapchat is where we can really be ourselves while being attached to our social identity. Without the constant social pressure of a follower count or Facebook friends, I am not constantly having these random people shoved in front of me.”

 

7 Activities Teen should avoid in Social Media

7 Activities Teens Should Avoid On Social Media

Activities Teens Should Avoid On Social Media
These Are 7 Activities Teens Should Avoid On Social Media

When it comes to social media, we all know that sharing information about ourselves can be fun. Having affirmation that your Facebook photos are cool and beautiful, or that something you Tweeted was retweeted multiple times, or that your latest Tumblr post was reposted again and again can be addicting. But, hazards can be overlooked in the good-faith process of sharing personal information. Below, seven activities your kids should avoid on social media in order to keep themselves, and their reputations, safe…

 1.Posting inappropriate photos of yourself

The selfie was the most popular image choice of 2013. But taking inappropriate selfies of yourself can lead to a negative image in the eyes of your potential employers or your school teachers–not to mention your peers. Once an image is posted, it can be found, no matter if it was deleted or if you thought the connection was private. Better to steer clear and just not post anything potentially scandalous altogether.

 2.Trash-talking a teacher, a classmate, a friend, a family-member, or a coworker

Sometimes people say mean things about other people that may or may not be true. Dirty talk can come back and bite you–and even destroy otherwise positive relationships.

Tactical Tip: Use the five minute rule: If you are passionate about posting or responding to someone, write out your tweet and wait five minutes before pressing “send.” After five minutes, if you still feel it’s a good idea, then post it. This is a great way to avoid saying something that might upset others in the heat of the moment.

 3.Spending more than 1 hour a day on social media

Teens and Tweens spend exorbitant amounts of time staring at screens these days. This can keep them from getting their homework done and also sometimes lead to a negative self perception. Try to complete your homework and studying before you approach social media. This will reduce your screen time and keep you focused.

 4.Sharing whereabouts online

Do your best to not post that you’ll be going on vacation (or are home alone). While there are more good-hearted people than there are creepers in the world, it only takes one negative experience to really damage your life.

 5.Posting private information

Likewise, do not post your credit card information, your phone number, your address, your mother’s maiden name, or your social security number. Private details like that are meant to keep your identity secure.

 6.Stalking other people

Obsessively commenting on every single post of another person can be annoying, and will almost always backfire against you. Keep it to a minimum.

7.Online bullying

And lastly, do not ridicule other people on social media (even if you think it’s harmless). Just because it’s not face-to-face does not make it any less hurtful, or any less cowardly. If you have an issue with someone, it is best to tell them in person. Don’t publicly humiliate or embarrass them online as an anonymous “e-warrior.”

These are our recommendations about what teens should avoid on social media.

Why teens are so obssesed with social media?

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Social media has, almost since its creation, been seen as something for young people. Whether it was the creation of Facebook on a college campus as a way for students to meet-up, or the general eye-rolling Twitter received for its short word limit, and popularity with the youth of the day, there’s a stigma that social media is just for young people. While sites like LinkedIn show that social media is useful for adults, and the sheer size of marketing budgets from large companies show that social media is recognized as a serious way to reach customers of all ages and demographics, the assumption remains that the core of social media is, and will always be, young people.

 

So, is there any truth to the idea that young people, particularly teens, are obsessed with social media?

 

Why Teens Are So Obsessed With Social Media?

 

To get a grasp on social media use, it’s a good idea to check out this study, over at Psychology Today. This study points out, first of all, that there are differences in generational use of social media. This seems like a no-brainer, since older generations are less likely to be online, while younger generations tend to be more tech savvy, and embrace concepts like social media much more often. On average, though, younger generations will only use 2 social media sites to the older generations 1. So, part of the idea that teens are “obsessed” with social media can probably be chalked up to the differences between generational uses. Just like how “kids these days” are “obsessed” with their phones. Their parents had something similar when they were that age, but it was a different technology, fad, or other social construct that they view as normal.

 

However, with that said, teens do use social media at a higher rate than older generations. Not only that, but they use all aspects of social media, from reading and liking posts, to sharing content, chatting, and playing games. Parents, who are concerned for their teens’ well-being, want to make sure that spending that much time online isn’t harming them in some way. If you find yourself in that category, remember this one, very important thing.

 

To Them Online Life Is Real Life

 

The Internet has completely changed the way we operate. It has shrunk the world, and completely changed the way industries, the economy, entertainment, and communication work forever. You can’t “just turn it off” and pretend that what happens online isn’t real, because it is real.

 

It isn’t that teens are dedicating themselves to social media instead of living their lives. It’s that social media is their preferred tool for communicating, sharing, and all the other things teens do as they grow into young adults.

 

Think about it. When the cordless phone became a household item, teens spent hours in their rooms talking to their friends. Why? For the same reason teens today use social media. It let them maintain their bonds, and grow their relationships, even if they didn’t have driver’s licenses, and couldn’t hang out in person. The Internet in general, and social media in particular, is simply a better tool, allowing teens to talk to all their friends, see their updates, and keep in touch in real-time.

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So, the next time you start to worry about your kids spending too much time on social media, don’t just make assumptions. Sit down with them, and have some face time. Ask them why they spend so much of their days on the computer, or a mobile device. Listen to their responses, and show that you aren’t judging them, or trying to catch them in a lie. If you keep open lines of communication, and support your teens, then they will feel much more comfortable letting you into the worlds they’re making for themselves as they grow up.

 

Maintaining a healthy balance with technology as a teenager is sometimes hard. There are plenty of other things vying for your teen’s attention, making it difficult for them to remember good habits and prioritize chores, school, and sleep. Thankfully, if  their mobile devices are what is keeping them from getting rest, as the parent, you can help. It is always easier to help your children and teens to maintain balance in their lives with mobile devices when you use a parental control software

 

Teenagers in Social Media

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Part of teenagers life is the social media life. The millennial teenagers are more exposed in technology than any generations before them. They are very much exposed in technology at an early age. They also believe that life would be more complicated and boring without social media. There’s nothing wrong in using social media as long as is it used properly and wisely. You have to know your limits and take control of your social media life. Social media are indeed fun! but the use of social networking sites has both positive and negative consequences. It can affect your mental, physical, social and emotional well-being.

TEENAGERS VIEW ABOUT SOCIAL MEDIA AND TO THOSE WHO ARE BORN IN GENERATION BEFORE THEM

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People who doesn’t know how to use media, or doesn’t have any social media account are boring. Most of them are our parents, grandparents and those who are born before our generation. We, as a millennial we like posting our different #OOTD or Outfit OThe Day and selfies. We’re very much updated about the new fashion trend etc. because of social media. We almost spend almost all of our whole lives in social media. It feels like we, millennials will be put into death if social media will be gone. Those who are born before us, we may think that they are so boring. We sometimes ask ourselves how they manage to live in a very boring life.

TEENS BEING SO CARELESS IN SOCIAL MEDIA

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Some people nowadays are being so careless and shameless. Yes, social media is something where you spend your time for sharing your different thoughts, ideas, life experiences, current status or whatever stuffs are inside your mind. Posting different kinds of stuffs can lead to misunderstanding. You have to always think about your privacy. Facebook, twitter, instagram or other social media sites are not a place to start a fight with someone. You usually do this for a battle purpose like putting shame on someone and start to ruin their lives. Did you know that thinking about ruining someone’s life is like ruining your own life too? What is lacking to some people out there is the knowledge about how to use social media properly. Set your limitations. Avoid using words that can offend or hurt someone. You have to always control your temper. You have to think before you click!

SEE THE NEGATIVE SIDE

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All we can see are the positive effects of social media to us. It gives us happiness, but we never notice the negative effects of this to us. Because we’re too busy chatting, taking a selfie, checking notifications from time to time, getting so problematic about getting thousands of likes and followers, we forget about our studies and our family as well. This weakens the family relationship and weakens or body as well due to lack of physical activity because all we know is to face our laptop or cellphones the whole day. This can also lead to hearing loss and vision problems. Some uses social media for bullying (cyberbullying) and sometimes for sexual abuse. You must always be careful and have the knowledge about this negative effects.

FACE YOUR PROBLEM DON’T FACEBOOK THEM

 

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We can all notice that teens of today keep on posting different facebook status. Sometimes we may think them as insane people or ask ourselves if they’re still in good mental condition for posting such personal things. You should never post stuffs that should be kept private for this could ruin yourself. Betrayals are everywhere! so you must be careful at all times. Instead of posting it to facebook, just FACE YOUR PROBLEMS!

 

CYBERBULLYING

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This is the act of posting rude, insulting, offensive and hurtful words in social media. It can bring a lot of negativity to a person being bullied and can ruin their lives as well. This can be done in many different ways. It can be done anonymously to keep them safe while ruining someone’s life. Cyber bullying can make a great change to someone like their attitudes in fact, some commit suicide because of this. Insecurity is the main reason why they do this. They keep on dragging someone ahead them. Some do this because of their problems in lives. Some do this whenever they’re bored and want to have some fun, but doing such things like this is never been fun! Well, whatever their reason is, they must stop bullying someone in social media because they will never like it if someone did it back to them.

ONLINE GAMES ADDICT

Related imageThere are so many addicting online games that you can play. With just one click you can play as many as you can. Yeah, as MANY as you can, that’s why some stayed up all night just to play without knowing all those negative effects that can affect not only their health but also their lives. Maybe because of boredom that’s why spent all day and night in playing and only stop to eat sleep. I will also advice the parents to follow what your kids are doing because spending too much time on computer games is one of the biggest dangers for the kids nowadays. Problems with online games become bigger if parents do not take enough care of children.

 

Teenagers in Social Media

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Part of teenagers life is the social media life. The millennial teenagers are more exposed in technology than any generations before them. They are very much exposed in technology at an early age. They also believe that life would be more complicated and boring without social media. There’s nothing wrong in using social media as long as is it used properly and wisely. You have to know your limits and take control of your social media life. Social media are indeed fun! but the use of social networking sites has both positive and negative consequences. It can affect your mental, physical, social and emotional well-being.

TEENAGERS VIEW ABOUT SOCIAL MEDIA AND TO THOSE WHO ARE BORN IN GENERATION BEFORE THEM

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People who doesn’t know how to use media, or doesn’t have any social media account are boring. Most of them are our parents, grandparents and those who are born before our generation. We, as a millennial we like posting our different #OOTD or Outfit OThe Day and selfies. We’re very much updated about the new fashion trend etc. because of social media. We almost spend almost all of our whole lives in social media. It feels like we, millennials will be put into death if social media will be gone. Those who are born before us, we may think that they are so boring. We sometimes ask ourselves how they manage to live in a very boring life.

TEENS BEING SO CARELESS IN SOCIAL MEDIA

Image result for putting shame through social media

Some people nowadays are being so careless and shameless. Yes, social media is something where you spend your time for sharing your different thoughts, ideas, life experiences, current status or whatever stuffs are inside your mind. Posting different kinds of stuffs can lead to misunderstanding. You have to always think about your privacy. Facebook, twitter, instagram or other social media sites are not a place to start a fight with someone. You usually do this for a battle purpose like putting shame on someone and start to ruin their lives. Did you know that thinking about ruining someone’s life is like ruining your own life too? What is lacking to some people out there is the knowledge about how to use social media properly. Set your limitations. Avoid using words that can offend or hurt someone. You have to always control your temper. You have to think before you click!

SEE THE NEGATIVE SIDE

Image result for negative effects of social media

All we can see are the positive effects of social media to us. It gives us happiness, but we never notice the negative effects of this to us. Because we’re too busy chatting, taking a selfie, checking notifications from time to time, getting so problematic about getting thousands of likes and followers, we forget about our studies and our family as well. This weakens the family relationship and weakens or body as well due to lack of physical activity because all we know is to face our laptop or cellphones the whole day. This can also lead to hearing loss and vision problems. Some uses social media for bullying (cyberbullying) and sometimes for sexual abuse. You must always be careful and have the knowledge about this negative effects.